Vezzali, Loris; Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio; Cadamuro, Alessia; Cocco, Veronica Margherita; Crapolicchio, Eleonora; Bicocchi, Nicola; Calderara, Simone; Giovannini, Dino; Zambonelli, Franco; Cucchiara, Rita "Using Kinect camera for investigating intergroup non-verbal human interactions" Abstract book IV workshop on Virtual Social Interactions, Londra, 17-18 dicembre 2018, 2018

Bibtex entry:

 @conference{
11380_1168519,
author = {Vezzali, Loris and Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio and Cadamuro, Alessia and Cocco, Veronica Margherita and Crapolicchio, Eleonora and Bicocchi, Nicola and Calderara, Simone and Giovannini, Dino and Zambonelli, Franco and Cucchiara, Rita},
title = {Using Kinect camera for investigating intergroup non-verbal human interactions},
year = {2018},
booktitle = {Abstract book IV workshop on Virtual Social Interactions},
abstract = {A long tradition in social psychology focused on nonverbal behaviour displayed during dyadic
interactions generally relying on evaluations from external coders. However, in addition to the fact
that external coders may be biased, they may not capture certain type of behavioural indices. We
designed three studies examining explicit and implicit prejudice as predictors of nonberval
behaviour as reflected in objective indices provided by Kinect cameras.
In the first study, we considered White-Black relations from the perspective of 36 White
participants. Results revealed that implicit prejudice was associated with a reduction in
interpersonal distance and in the volume of space between Whites and Blacks (vs. Whites and
Whites), which in turn were associated with evaluations by collaborators taking part in the
interaction.
In the second study, 37 non-HIV participants interacted with HIV individuals. We found that
implicit prejudice was associated with reduced volume of space between interactants over time (a
process of bias overcorrection) only when they tried hard to control their behaviour (as captured by
a stroop test).
In the third study 35 non-disabled children interacted with disabled children. Results revealed that
implicit prejudice was associated with reduced interpersonal distance over time.}
}